About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CNBC 23
FBC 18
CNNW 13
CNN 9
KNTV (NBC) 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 91
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
against the prime minister's government. they say the government promotes sectarian policies that discriminate against them. the latest violence began after the police. -- block protesters from entering the city. >> which call upon the army -- we call upon the army affiliated with iraq. if it is only loyal to the muslim nation and only belongs to the good land of iraq, to open the way for the scholars and people to give in to the city. they are not allowed to get in right now. the army has to be loyal to iraq. >> let's take some live pictures coming in from fallujah. the crowds are still swelling. a lot of sunnis and happy and calling for the government to be dissolved and one more representative of the people to be formed. we will bring you the story as we get the details. let's continue with live pictures. this is coming from egypt. people are beginning to gather in tahrir square. a large turnout is expected in the next few hours. opposition groups are marking the second anniversary of the revolution. overnight, protesters fought with police in and around tahrir square. doz
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
at all. i think this was an exercise in showing that the government and the bank of japan, the central bank are on the same page. they certainly delivered that. i think the fact that it's an open-ended asset purchase program, it was more than what the markets had been factoring in. i think the dollar/yen moves are sort of moving independently right now. and i think a lot of that has to do with the comments that we had from government saying, oh, we're not trying to manipulate the currency, which throws into question this competitive devaluation story they were banking on. instead of being explicit about that over the last couple of weeks, now they're going to have to be a little bit more implicit about that. but the man of the hour, mr. shiraka shirakawa, the bank of japan, here is what he had to say. >> translator: japan believes growth is important. we teamed up with the dwoft to strengthen our policies and work on this goal together as one. >> let's take a look at the technicals about this 2% inflation target. because at the same time today, the bank of japan is saying the price of
politics. many are still traumatized. al jazeera, malian border. >> in syria, activists say government forces are shelling more on the capital damascus. activists also posted this video online of rebels of having regime troops in a prison. rebels have read more than 80 inmates. an iranian official said an attack on syria is considered an attack on iran. patriot missile battles could spark a broader conflict. turkey and nato stressed the system is particularly defensive. >> these batteries are designed to intercept missiles and the threats comes from syria. this is one of three areas. turkey and nato officials have repeatedly said the missiles will in no way be used for an offensive operation or to support a no-fly zone. >> it is pretty obvious that the defensive systems are only for defensive purposes want you look -- want to look at their location. >> and it just as the deployment will contribute to the deal escalation of the prices along the border. russia and iran have said the deployment could spark a broader conflict. >> turkey requested the misfiles after several incidences. thos
meeting had ministers from both governments working on, proposals to deepen the economic and military union. >> she says the proposals are about a deeper cooperation in economic policy with the goal a social security, employment, nd financials. >> the spirit of cooperation was exactly what the treaty of friendship was all about. >> here is a look back. >> the idyllic village near the border region has a special place in european history. and is the birthplace of the franco-german friendship. after two world wars, if you believe such a thing was possible. the unthinkable did happen. they did not have much in common. both catholic and a conservative. >> what was surprising is that the first contact in 1958 did not take place in the palace but at his private the state in a comfortable family surroundings. they spent the whole weekend of their. he treated him like a guest of the family. he did not stay in a hotel. >> he was the only politician to have been given that privilege. any mistrust between the two men evaporated. >> their relationship led to the declaration of a musical about. th
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
in the third quarter. >> he also weighed in on the irish government's efforts to boost its economy, saying progress was being made, but insisted more could be done. >> the government has not necessarily addressed all the issues. they've done well and they've certainly addressed certain aspects of the cost space within ireland. but for those companies, particularly retailers, we're operating within the irish domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are
a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
.com/thankyoucards to apply. >> remake our government and revamp our tax code. >> the era of liberalism is back. >> medicare and medicaid. >> far left center. >> social security. >> president obama being accused of trying to annihilate the gop by pushing a far left agenda, but is he really that liberal? good shouldn't afternoon to you. i'm craig melvin. you're watching msnbc. we'll also look at how the worlds of sports and politics collide, and this. >> we're all getting a little emotional and sentimental around here. >> hillary clinton bowing out of state department, but she's hardly bowing out of politics. a view from inside hillaryland. that's coming up, and on this international holocaust remembrance day, we talk to nobel peace prize winner ely weizel about what we learned and what we have yet to understand. >> first though guns on the agenda this week in washington. the senate on wednesday will hold first congressional hearing on gun violence since president obama announced his gun control proposals. mark kelley, the husband of former congresswoman gabrielle giffords who was seriously injured in a mass
.c. beltway and was pretty adamant the fiscal cliff was not armageddon and our government is becoming less dysfunctional. you got get the worries in the rear view mirror and people look what is going well. housing recovery is real. auto situation is strong. david: let me hold you on housing for a second, jeff. we had a pullback on prices. we had a tremendous run-up in 2012 in the price of housing. were you worried at all on the prices today? >> not really because if you drill down into the numbers, beneath the surface numbers are really not all that bad. i'm here in real estate central in st. petersburg, clear water, tampa, the housing recovery is real. you're seeing spec homes built and they're trading hands. sandra: get to your individual picks. there are certain stocks you like. you tend to favor the cyclical sectors. i'm seeing names like hewlett-packard, intel, mosaic, general motors to. tell us about your picks. >> those are the last four we put on. we're basically set up with cyclical companies that range from things like general motors, hewlett-packard, intel and technology, techno
employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took the might of these people to the top today, to the world economic summit in davous. >> jordan is hosting almost 300,000. the weakest ref gos are struggling now just to survive this year's harsh winter. more international support is desperately needed. and it's only going to get worse. >> back there syria it is indeed getting worse. these people filmed getting out and leaving in the past 24 hours. it's partly
called on france and the malian government to end their offensive to open the way for talks. the conflict has been going on for a year now. the situation is complex with a tuareg rebellion, an army coup, and an islamist uprising. and many are hoping that the french-led intervention will end the crisis. we met members of the community living here in berlin. and she goes to work, just another winter day in berlin, but her thoughts are with her relatives some 4,000 kilometers away. her family had to flee the north of the country. she talks to them on the phone almost every day. >> i think that if it was not for french intervention, the islamists would be in the capital. i could sense the relief when i spoke to my family on the phone. they were living in incredible fear until the french arrived. it was really bad. >> marcel experienced this terror on the ground. he was visiting timbuktu in early 2012 with the islamists arrived. >> these four or five days that i spent there after the coup -- that was the worst time. also in terms of my personal experiences with people. and then, there's what r
that the election said more than anything else is the people of our country want to see a government that works. >> yes. regardless of whether that's about taxes or cuts. ? and we've got to -- and i hope the administration and barack obama, the president, will come and join us and say, look, it's time for us to set differences aside and do what any couple does, any group of people do, which is say, look, you're not going to agree 100% on everything and you're not going to agree 100% on anything, so find where we can agree. >> and when they did that on january 1st of the year you voted against it. they found middle ground between democrats and -- >> there was no middle ground because where were the cults? here's what we did. >> middle ground on the fact you guys asked for no tax increases, then put a threshold of a million dollars. >> we had always said, according to the boehner rule, we had always said if we're going to raise revenues through borrowing, through taxing, we've got to do something about the problem. you can't keep digging the hole deeper and keep asking people to pay more taxes. >
of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how does it change, if at all your strategy from here? >> it makes having a long-term strategy really, really tough
last night. plus, the world economic forum, the most powerful names in business and government gathering in davos, switzerland. wednesday, january 23, 2013. and "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ >>> welcome to "squawk box" on cnbc, i'm becky quick with ross westgate. andrew is reporting from switzerland. that's why we've got the mountain music. we'll get to andrew in a moment. first, the top stories. the common theme here quarterly results, shares of google getting a boost. earnings and revenue topping consensus and perhaps more important metrics, revenue from google's core internet business. it outpaced many analysts' expectations. advertising rates fell less than in proves periods. as you see, the stock was up -- this morning up almost 5% in the premarket. ibm shares jumping after the bell. earnings and revenue beating the street, as well. the world's largest technology services company offering a better than expected outlook for 2013. that stock, as you see, up by 4% in the premarket. also, we had advanced microdevices. it came in with a smaller than expected loss in the fo
's gun-control proposals. while the government has come out against the plan, the numbers are pretty stark. 53% are favorable. 41%, unfavorable. more interesting as you go into the poll, the favorables are much more intense than the unfavorables. which means that we've heard for some time, richard wolffe, you know, the gun owners are so intense, and they're the ones that are going to always make phone calls and they're the ones that are always going to be engaged. in this poll and i'm sure we'll see it in other polls, a majority of americans are more intense about passing some sane gun regulation than are those small groups of people that are going to fight the political death over assault weapons and being able to have high-capacity magazines. >> a couple of things. first of all, if you break down the individual proposals, the support is even higher, right? universal background checks, you get way higher than 50%. and those numbers reflect the president's own favorability right now which says this is the moment when he can actually push this through because his own numbers are so hi
government workers like teachers, firefighters, public administrators. time now for lou dobbs. >> one hates to lose the public administrators and one wonders how the nation will be administered without them. it is an interesting story. it is counter to conventional views and expectations of most people. we have been watching the battles at the national labor relations board. we know that the president has stacked it with his allies and em baa stairs to the marketplace, and there is this expectation that the powerful organization fl-cio, the service employees union, the teachers unions are just growing and growing, which they had been until last year. we started to see the impact of those local cuts in budgets. this government, this administration, pumped, as you recall in the stimulus package, hundreds of billions of dollars into the hiring of what had been traditionally union jobs, teachers, police, you name it. that's over. what we are seeing now is the market place begins to work. now, as we look at how dramatic these reductions are, basically 6.5% membership in the private sector tells
and one head of government. we'll see them in coming weeks. this week one king and one prime minister. we'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits in turmoil between syria, egypt, iraq and saudi arabia. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the
2008 has lent or raised $7 trillion-plus for people. all around the world, including governments, schools, cities, hospitals, small businesses, large -- that's our job. we try to do it very well. the whale mistake up there -- no customers, wasn't venal. terrible mistake, if you're a shareholder, i apologize deeply. we did have record results, life goes on. >> when i came to the industry, i was under no illusion that the industry didn't have its issues. they need to be fixed. and what we tried to do at ubs is two things. first, i think banks need a new strategy. and we embarked on a bold new strategy for ubs. the right strategy. at the same time we need to deal with the legacy. to get on top of the issues, you need to get to the bottom of things. for us, a settlement of libor was an important step in going in that direction. these things need to be on the table. taxpayers want to know about it. and transparency simply has to be there. when we found this issue going on in the bank, we completely made contact and complied with the regulators. we had a very good interaction with regu
. there's pressure, of course, and governments are bringing in pressure to bring drug price down. where is the balance between the two? because, you know, we want cheaper drugs that provide for patients, but what does that do for you? >> you want, of course, affo affordable drugs, but on the other hand, we need new, good drugs because there is so much on the medical need. there are still so many diseases that are not supposedly treated. plus, science its made so much progress even in the last decade that there is an opportunity to come out with better drugs. and the simple message is the pharmaceutical industry understands that there has to be a certain control on the costs that cannot bring out of control. but on the other side, if you want to continue to have new drugs, we need to get, you know, rewarded for innovation. and this is a dilemma and not really all that is well understood by government. >> drought, very low yield from around the world. >> if value is good news, it's driving people to look for things that are going to help the world. what's the outlook for that? >> well, yo
to the govern of the bank of italy about this, as well, this morning. he was saying, look, we didn't drop the ball over derivative trade. this is -- he said we shouldn't have any concerns about the stability of this particular bank. >> the situation was known and under careful consideration for a long time. as a matter of fact, we have been pulling the liquidity conditions of the bank and in the eba analysis and the need for further capitalization, we clearly doubt that there was a need of further capitalization and the bank was not able to provide -- and then the issue of the loan. so this is the process that we are considering. >> all right. that's governor of the bank of italy. also, coming up on today's program, mario draghi is speaking here in davos in around about 20 minutes. don't go anywhere. >>> coming up from davos, in the meantime, though, i want to give you a check on market action on this friday as we basically wrap up, get close to wrapping up the month of january. the stoxx europe 600 is looking up about 0.2%. it's mostly advancers. about a three to two ratio against declin
and creating an environment for businesses to invest because they think governments are being responsible, things have slowed down so much there's been so much unemployment, 11.6% in the euro zone than it's having the opposite effect. we have to find a more dalan ba approach to how we go forward. europe has a disproportionate influence of this conversation. there is a conversation particularly vis-a-vis the united states as to how much is too much and how much austerity, how much in terms of cutting back is actually enough, christine? >> really nice to see you. when you run into indiana jones, he can have his hat back. nice to see you. >> how many bars are there over the world that have pictures of you in them? >> no, i turned 28 at a davos -- last year -- and it was one of the best birthdays ever. first time i ever ran into kings and bankers and princesses. it's really an interesting .01% of the global leaders. >> with the official public swearing inform the president all done, you know that, small matter over, the really big news of the day -- what was she wearing? look at that lovely r
government budget balancing is hurting employment and will probably lead to more job losses in the near future. >> all right. let's take a look at the markets this morning. markets have been sitting at these record levels. you can see right now those dow futures pulling down by about 12 points. s&p futures are indicated slightly lower, as well. but the nasdaq is indicated higher. the dow jones transport sitting at an all-time high. other markets sitting at five-year highs. the big question is whether the dow jones industrial average follows suit. you're a huge transport. >> yeah, i am. that's all all-time highs. >> all-time high. oil prices, you can take a look. you'll see right now is down by about 2 cents to 95.54. the ten-year note that had been coming down the yields last week a little bit, you can see the yield right now is at 1.877%. the dollar this morning after the euro picked up strength last week, the dollar is stronger against the euro and the yen and the pound. right now, dollar/yen is at 88.79. gold prices this morning up about $5.80. $1,6933. >>> german chancellor angela m
. we can have a positive development if national governments will persevere in their actions. both in fiscal consolidation, but especially now on the front of structural reforms. >> steve liesman is here with a little bit more on this, but you're not wearing long underwear. >> no. but i have any gloves on. >> you're a little cold. >> we've been standing out here for a while. what did you think of draghi? a lot of people here talking about it and i wonder whether it's going to ultimately move the market. >> there's a couple of things. he said the victory lap. he said we relaunched the euro in 2012. a lot of talk with chris at this teen legarde in europe today. 2015, talking about this growth in the back half. i think draghi's intentions today were not to mess things up. the general feeling here is that what the ecb has done with the current situation, perhaps created the underlying conditions for growth. >> i hosted a dinner with christine legarde last night. one of the things that came up mario draghi said this morning that maybe we have good fall back into a problem again. >> well
. barbara now reporting this connection, that the u.s. government sees. barbara said, we did talk about this last would be hours after the siege began. i spoke on the phone with omar amaha, a military leader in the militant group izarden. he told me americans were being held mestage and the attackers demanded the end to french and american involvement in mali for their release. he knew because, he told me, he's working with because of al qaeda's most senior leaders, mokhtar belmokhtar, the person claiming responsibility for the january 16th attack. omar hamaha made claims how widespread the terror network is in north africa when i asked how many fighters he had. >> translator: listen. the number of fighters is not important for us. be it 10,000 or only 10 people. we're going to hit in the heart all the countries of west africa. it's no longer only in northern mali. yes, it's not only in bomoko. it will be western africa. not only western africa, a big battle against france and the united states and all the other countries that want to intervene. >> retired general wesley clark is the fo
in mali is the destablizing the mali government. now nearby regions are seeing that there is a north african movement of islamism, or islamist. they're seeing weakening governments. they're using economic interests and foreign nationals as weapons because the biggest threat to the jihadist movement is western interests in the area and if they can get us to pull out, get france and europe to pull out, companies like this algerian gas company that was working with british and working with the norway statoil, if they can get them to pull out they will be more able to establish a foothold like they have done in mali and continue to spread into this vacuum that we have been completely missing in action with. melissa: steven, when you hear about the billion barrels in iraq, do you discount it because he hear about attacks like this in algeria? you realize again, just how difficult it is to get this oil to market? >> well, indeed. the situation in algeria, melissa, reminds us how vulnerable these situation situations in north africa is as your guest just said. two years ago with the libyan
stimulus and government deficit spending. without those two things and trillions of dollars the overall global economy wouldn't be where it is right now. i would also somely say that -- simply say the effects of deficit spending and central bank monetizaton of that debt is having a reduced effect every time they do more. my opinion as i look at data, the global economy is slowing. earnings growth is slowing. last year was the story of investors being willing to pay more but at the end of the year than the beginning of year for prices as pe multiple expansion occurred. think 2013 will be a much more challenging year not only stocks but --. david: let me force your hand on one issue here. do you think apple could be, everybody is looking at apple as though it is anomaly in otherwise healthy market, could apple actually be a forward indicator what might happen to the overall market? >> yes. apple's a great business. i own their products. they're a great story but i have to ask, does apple deserve to be the largest capitalized company on the planet, bigger than exxonmobil? i don't think so.
products. lori: let's talk about regulation. you are on the record saying that the government has been standing over money market funds with the club since the 1970s trying to kill them and these three proposals by the sec are three forms of debt. very subtle? >> yes. by the way it was three items fsoc was coming up with. the sec had an idea coming up with very similar proposals last year and the majority, bipartisan majority of the sec commissioners would not support those ideas. so then they turned around and came out with fsoc and, because they changed the net asset value, put restrictions on redemptions, caused inordinant capital to be considered, that's what i did say, it would be death by hang, death by hanging death by poison and death by bullet. lori: this is reaction to the reserve primary fund in 2008, the systemic risk, right, partly to blame for the entire credit crisis during that time period. so what's the right solution here? >> well the money market fund were not to blame for the credit problems. they were a victim of the problem and the situation that is not usually to
days a $2 billion loss which it is blaming on defense cuts and falling government demand. >> the measures will have to be taken. layoffs and the defense industry. most importantly to me, devastating growth to our national security at the sequestration takes place. it is up to congress and the president to act together. frankly, so far, i have not been the type of urgency that many of us feel about sequestration and its implementation. >> it seems that the war being wound down in afghanistan that the real fight is beginning at home for tighter budgets. melissa: jennifer griffin, thank you very much. illinois heading to disaster. joining us now, dan rutherford. that is coming up. lori: are you overeducated and underemployed? the new normal of this job recovery. ♪ . . . .. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the rig
because on this day the republican-controlled house voted 285-114 to allow the government to keep borrowing the money it needs to pay its bills through mid-may. the senate and the white house are expected to go along avoiding the threat of default that would rattle financial markets. in a survey of investors by bloomberg, 36% said america's fiscal woes are the biggest threat to the world economy, more than the 29% who named the european debt crisis. anthony mason is attending a meeting of world bankers in davos, switzerland. >> reporter: how strong do you think the u.s. economy actually is right now? >> i think the u.s. economy wants to be strong. >> reporter: but mary callahan erdoes says the bickering in washington is holding it back. erdos is one of the most powerful women on wall street. as c.e.o. of j.p. morgan asset management, she presides over $1.2 trillion in investments. >> the u.s. has to realize it's got so much going for it. let's just get ourselves to come together as a team, one team running that country, helping to get itself back on stable footing which then casca
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)